Geschwister Scholl Institute of Political Science
print

Language Selection

Breadcrumb Navigation


Content

Hilde van Meegdenburg, MSc.

Lecturer

Contact

Ludwig-Maximilians-University
Chair of Global Governance and Public Policy
Oettingenstr. 67
80538 Munich

Room: H102
Phone: +49 (0) 89 2180-9053

Office hours:
Tuesday, 13:30-14:30

Further Information

Academic positions and fellowships

  • 10.2016 – current || Postdoctoral research fellow, Chair of Global Governance and Public Policy, Geschwister-Scholl-Institute, LMU Munich.
  • 10.2016 – current || Postdoctoral research fellow, Chair for European and Global Governance, Hochschule für Politik, Technical University Munich.
  • 09.2015 – 09.2016 || Research fellow, Chair of Global Governance and Public Policy, Geschwister-Scholl-Institute, LMU Munich.
  • 01.2014 – 05.2014 || Visiting fellow to Prof. R. Abrahamsen, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Ottawa, Canada.
  • 04.2013 – 06.2013 || Einstein visiting fellow to Prof. A. Kacowicz, Department of International Relations, Hebrew University, Israel.
  • 2011 – 2015 || Stipendiatin (scholarship) der Fritz Thyssen Stiftung, Free University Berlin and Hertie School of Governance Berlin.

Education

  • 2011 – 2016 || Dr. rer. pol., Free University Berlin, Germany. Supervisors: Prof. M. Jachtenfuchs (Hertie School of Governance), Prof. S. Chojnacki (Free University Berlin).
  • 2010 – 2011 || MSc. in International Relations and Transnational Governance, Free University Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • 2008 – 2009 || MSc. in Business Administration, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Research interests

Security governance, international interventions, foreign and defence policy, constructivist approaches, emotions in IR, private military and security companies.

Peer reviewed publications

 

  • ‘Nachfrage aus dem ‘Westen’ trifft Arbeit aus dem ‘Süden’: PMSCs und der Einsatz von internationalen labour supply chains in der westlichen Kriegsführung’. In: Zeitschrift für Friedens- und Konfliktforschung (6)2, forthcoming.

Method seminars and workshops (Process Tracing)

Up-coming or ongoing:

  • ECPR Winter School in Methods and Techniques, 2-9 March 2018, Bamberg, Germany: Introduction to Process Tracing.
  • LMU Master Seminar, WiSe 2017/18: Process Tracing: drawing inferences from case studies.
  • HfP/TUM Lectures + seminar, WiSe 2017/18: Advanced Qualitative methods.

Past (most recent):

  • ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques, 7-11 August 2017, Budapest, Hungary: Process Tracing Methodology II – Evidence and Empirical Testing in Practice.
  • LMU, Geschwister-Scholl-Institute, 20.07.2017, Munich, Germany: Process Tracing Workshop for Mid-level Faculty.
  • ECPR Winter School in Methods and Techniques, 3-10 March 2017, Bamberg, Germany: Introduction to Process Tracing.
  • ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques, 1-5 August 2016, Budapest, Hungary: Process Tracing Methodology I – Foundations and Guidelines.
  • ECPR Short Methods Courses, 10.07.2017, University of Tartu, Estonia: Process Tracing.

Teaching SoSe 2018

Hauptseminar IB - Political Psychology and Emotions in IR (in English)
Modul: WP7
Course descirption:
Work on emotions in IR shows that emotions play an important, albeit under-acknowledged, role in international politics. In this field of research it is noted that affect, trust, fear, anger, humiliation, and other (inter-)subjective experiences co-shape interpretations and therewith decisions and behaviour of political actors. Starting from the constructivist insight that interpretation matters(!) for political processes this course offers an introduction into Political Psychology and explores the roles of a.o. cognition, identity, and emotions. The course will start by discussing more theoretical and ontological questions regarding both constructivist IR in general and (inter-)subjective emotional experiences in particular, and slowly move towards more methodological and practical questions. In short: what is the role of emotions in IR? And, if they matter, how can we study them?